*Book Editors~How do we find that one, which fits our needs and wallets?* Part Two

February 25, 2017

Resources I used to find an editor:

  1. Word of mouth (be careful here, this situation can be like the shady ass mechanic that everybody endorses as if he or she cannot help themselves)

  2. Elance (which is now Upwork)

  3. Fiverr

  4. Google

  5. Advertise on Facebook

  6. Advertise on Twitter

While surfing the net, I found this little piece of information. I think it is priceless!

 

(Experienced copy editors might be able to edit about 10 pages per hour, which would mean they make $0.014 per word if they charge an hourly rate of $35. That makes $1,120 for an 80,000-word manuscript. According to the EFA, basic copyediting for an average-length manuscript would cost $960-2,560.)

 

This information led me to the site Editorial Freelancers Association, which has been around since 1970 and they have a price chart listed on the site that would be helpful. http://www.the-efa.org/res/rates.php check out the price for basic editing-copyediting, go from there. Remember this is just editing!

 

The Society for Editors and Proofreaders prices are similar, almost the same as the (EFA) and some of their people have a Certification https://www.sfep.org.uk/

 

Rant

After writing My Motivation, I was referred to an editor; they had me with their speech of fair market pricing. This price was just for editing, no proofreading included. The person would do the editing first, then do the proofreading afterward was what I thought. Well I contacted the person, they sent me their price list, and I fainted.

 

The basic price for my 104-page book would cost $156,000. After being revived and propped up. I contacted the person; and they said it was a mistake, that the price would be $15,000. That sent me to the bathroom! To make a long story short; unless I can drive you, sleep-in you and on you, and eat you for years to come. Then you will never see me pay $15,000 to get a book edited.

 

It makes no sense that the cost is that high or that it was allowed to explode the way it has. For those who say, well you are just cheap. Here’s some information that I got from an editor, who explained that they only charge for editing. However, they will proofread and offer suggestions. However, the base fee relies on editing services; they charge $45 an hour.

 

I was told that their price normally ranges from the low $2000 to the mid-$3000 range. Out of curiosity, I asked how many clients a month, do they service? I was told anywhere from four to six clients. Many are referrals or repeat customers. At $2500 a piece that is an excellent monthly salary even after paying your taxes. So imagine the high end of the business, wow what a payday for an editor, what a yearly salary.

 

I have a Masters in Human Resources, don’t make anywhere near that amount. I know teachers with double Masters who barely make $45,000 a year, with over thirty years of experience (Food For Thought)

Well, let’s get back on topic!

 

I was advised by that same editor to take my time going over my book before placing it in the hands of an editor. Of course put money aside while I am writing. Be honest and upfront with my expectations when I start searching for an editor. The biggest tip or the best advice that I was given. Was to look for that editor who is passionate about what they do, he or she will not exploit you. (I found this to be a contradiction. How can you give such good advice, and then expect me to buy your car for you?)

 

Advice

I used all of this advice and then some. I also purchased several books on punctuation. I had a version of this book ten or fifteen years ago The Gregg Reference Manual; I found another one on Amazon. I loved it back then and love it even more now. The link below is to McGraw-Hills online website related to the Gregg Reference book.

 

http://highered.mheducation.com/sites/0073545430/information_center_view0/index.html

The Elements of Style; another great book to read, that will help you edit your work before handing it off to that professional. I found this book on Amazon as well.

 

While you are on the hunt for that editor that won’t break your wallet. Use books, beta readers, and any other resources that you can find that will aid you in lowering that price for an editor. Do not be afraid to shop around, ask around, and view the person’s previous work if you're able too.

 

Kim

 

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Richmond, Virginia, United States

Email@Kim_Walton@yahoo.com

Copyright@2019 Kim L. Walton